Who am I?

IV 10 - B&W Still

 

My name is Geoff Moseley, and I’m a photographer and filmmaker living in London with my wife and daughter. I am no relation to Oswald Mosley (different spelling), and I’m definitely not a fascist. 

For the past 30 years I’ve worked in the mainstream media as a cameraman and editor, meeting and filming an enormous cross section of society from the homeless to royalty, the very poor to the very rich, and the powerful to the powerless.

Have a look at geoffmoseley.com for examples of my work.

When I left school the idea of entering politics never entered my head. To quote Billy Connelly: “The desire to be a politician should be enough to ban you from ever becoming one”, which makes me the ideal candidate. To be perfectly frank, filmmaking’s got to be far more interesting than what passes for politics these days.

So why start a political party and stand for election? Because my contempt for the existing political class far outweighs my desire to ignore it. Ever since Tony Blair established “New Labour”, the Labour Party has effectively ceased to be. Rather than representing the working class, they’ve swung to the right and, like the Tories, represent vested interests. Frankly, they have a hide calling themselves the Labour Party. “Blew Labour” would be more accurate.

There’s been a lot of talk lately about revolution, but no one seems willing to start one. But just as the Czechs had their Velvet Revolution in the late 80’s, so can we, but with one important distinction: we already have democracy. That fight was fought and won a hundred years ago, and all we have to do is line up in an orderly fashion and vote for the revolution. We just need someone else to vote for, so I’m sticking my head above the parapet to say “Vote for me!”

But I can’t do it on my own. A lone voice in Parliament is nowhere near enough to achieve political reform. I’m asking people right around the country who feel the same as I do – and there must be millions – to join me on this difficult journey. I’m especially appealing to those of you who don’t vote: you might think you’re not voting, but by not voting you’re voting for the existing order: the Establishment. Not only that, you’re turning your back on your ancestors who fought a three hundred year class war for the right to have a say in how we’re governed. The Establishment love the fact you don’t vote. After all, they fought a prolonged, nasty war to stop you.

So please: join the party – it’s free – and if you can, make a donation. Politics is an expensive business, and I can’t do it on my own.